new-sink

“It’s amazing what a sink will do!” I blurted out to my Visions Group on Wednesday when we met. Two weeks before, at our last session, I had described what happened with my purchase of a new vanity and its installation.

My contractor had under-estimated the scope of the job and the aging pipes he would have to hook up to when he initially looked at my tiny New York City bathroom. “I can do this for about $300.”

The day he went to actually connect the pipes and tubes, he waved me into the space and pointed with his flashlight at THE PROBLEM. “These pipes are quite old, and to connect to them is going to take more expertise than I have. You’ll need to hire a licensed plumber.”

I felt a sinking (pun NOT intended, but pretty funny now that I look at it!) feeling in my gut. “How much?” I murmured.

“To do it right, it could be as high as $2000.” Eek! If I’m going to spend $2K, I would prefer it was on something that would show, like a piece of art or a European vacation.

My building is 50 years old, and the possibility that incorrectly installed pipes could result in flooding in the apartment(s) below, is a strong likelihood and not a chance I could take. But, was I willing to make this expensive, long-term investment or stick with the sink I inherited when I bought the place in February?

Here’s that one (see lower right image). Depressing, right? Not only is it old and unattractive, the porcelain drain area has worn down and rusted. Plus, the entire unit sits a good 4″ too low for my height.

I had ordered a lovely piece via Home Depot which my builder had unpacked and put in as a place holder. “Oh, Jane,” he said once he had it lined up. “More bad news. I’m noticing that there’s a crack in the marble top. You’ll have to return it.”

Even though it was a hairline fracture, it would have to go back. Meaning that I would be without a bathroom sink until Home Depot shipped out a replacement AND a plumber could be found to do the installation.

Home Depot took full responsibility (bless them!), gave me a credit and then some. When they went to re-order the same model, they noted that it was on sale and the savings would be another couple of hundred dollars.

Still, did I want to go the expensive route and do it right? I glumly reported this information to my Visions team two weeks ago. One of my goals was to have a decision by the next time we met.

In cases like this where I really am at a loss for what to do, I turn it over to my higher power. “Send me a sign, or direct my thoughts,” I put out to the Universe. A moment later I knew that I had to commit to doing it right, pipes and all. I became willing to take $2K out of savings and put it into my renovation.

old-sink

My contractor suggested I have my super come take a look. He’s been maintaining this building for 25 years. He knows pipes and had helped me when I first moved in with my bathtub fixtures.

“When do you need this done?” he asked.

“As soon as possible,” I said wishfully.

“Give me an hour,” he replied, left and returned after lunch to do the job. “It’ll be $245. Is that okay?”

I practically kissed him.

He did all the prep work while I waited for my new delivery to arrive. When the unbroken new vanity was delivered, my super super came up and finished the job, just in time for me to take a picture and show it to my Visions partners.

“It’s a quality of life thing,” I explained, though they knew exactly what I meant. “I’m incredibly happy every time I brush my teeth!”

I find that when I let go and turn a big decision over to something outside of myself, I experience an outcome that is much better than anything I could have dreamt up. Not only did I not have to spend $2000, but the amount it cost me to have the plumbing hook-up done was the exact amount I was refunded from Home Depot.

There’s power in letting go, not trying to figure everything out and trusting the wisdom of the world out there over my tiny mind.

 

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